How do you travel safe and healthy? Before you go, think about what you’re going to need. What you think are travel essentials might not be important and maybe bringing three pairs of shoes is not the best idea. If it’s necessary, make a travel packing list. What are some of your travel essentials or necessities? What should be on this travel packing list? What will you need and what will you not? Well whatever you do, don’t forget your passport, otherwise you’re not going anywhere. Also you don’t want to pack too much that your backpack isn’t going to fit in overhead compartments or hostel lockers. Many travel necessities you can buy overseas, but just make sure to leave enough space for them in your luggage.
Before you make that travel packing list, here are some things to consider:
Photocopies – An absolute must! Before you leave home make sure you make two copies of your passport, visa, travelers cheques, tickets, etc. Leave one at home and bring the others with you, separate from the originals of course. Why, you may ask? Well, in the case of you losing any of them, it’s easier to obtain a copy or a replacement.
Mobile phone – As mentioned in the previous article, most smartphones today can be “unlocked.” This allows you to use your phone in any country that you go. If you’re not a smartphone user, then look into purchasing a mobile phone in your destination country. Most cell phone plans today are pay-as-you-go and are relatively cheap.
Know your embassy – They’re there to help! It’s always a good idea to at least have the address of your home country’s embassy. They’ll do what they can to help you get replacements of whatever you lose and make sure you have a safe travel experience. Just don’t break the law because they’re not going to bail you out of jail.
First-aid kit – Depending where you’re going, you can find these at a pharmacy or market. Now, should you pack this before you leave home or should you buy this in the country you’re going? That all depends on how accident prone you are. Are you the kind of person that’s going to instantly get hurt once you exit the plane?
Ear plugs – A snoring bunkmate can really make or break your hostel experience, not to mention the loud noises of people partying or traffic near by are almost inevitable. These are definitely travel essentials.
Plastic bags – Unless you want all your clothes to smell like your dirty socks you’ve been exploring in all day, then bring some bags with you to put your dirty clothes in. Only a couple will save you from other fellow travelers thinking you’re a smelly person, and who wants to travel with a person like that?
Power adaptor – This is a definite travel essential. Don’t worry about buying it before you leave home. You can wait until you get to your travel destination and buy one there, it’s much easier that way. Be aware, these may be good for plugging in phones, tablets or laptops, however make sure if it’s any other type of electronic to talk to the manufacturer about it and ask what they suggest.
Rain gear – Put this on your travel packing list. No matter where you go, there is going to be rain. So make sure you bring yourself, at LEAST, a rain coat.
Padlock – If you’re deciding to stay in hostels for the duration of your travels, then pick one of these up. Most hostels will have lockers you can store your things in while you’re away.
Flash drive – These are great for saving important documents you need for your travels, and also for putting your photos on when your camera gets full.
Wash your hands – Sounds kind of obvious but it’s something we tend to not do as often as we should. You can prevent many illnesses by simply washing your hands. Besides, if you’re going to be moving from place to place, who knows what kind of bacteria you can pick up without knowing it.
Eat healthy – Eating healthy usually means eating cheap as well, which can be a plus cause when traveling on a budget. You can do some things like go to a market to buy food and not eat at restaurants, pack snacks so you don’t skip meals, eat plenty of proteins, and remember to drink lots of water.
Learn the language – Depending where you’re going, it’s always a good idea to learn some phrases in the native language. You don’t need to be fluent but it can be the difference between saying “Yes, I speak English,” and “Yes, I speak groin.”